Explain testosterone

Testosterone makes you angry.  This is probably the most common myth about T. The reality is that there’s no concrete evidence that high testosterone levels cause anger and violent outbursts. In fact, the opposite might be true; low testosterone, not high T, is what causes anger and irritability in men. As discussed above, having low T levels has been linked to depression in men and it just so happens that two of the primary symptoms of depression in men are increased angry outbursts and irritability. So if you’re chronically angry, you might be depressed, and you might be depressed because you have low T. As I mentioned above, I became  less  moody and irritable during my experiment, which I attribute to the boost in my testosterone levels.

While we are familiar with the Propionate ester the remaining three esters that create Sustanon-250 are almost always found as part of a mixture or compounded anabolic androgenic steroid .

Developed by Organon, the original idea behind Sustanon-250 was to provide a testosterone form well-suited for hormone replacement therapy that would only needed to be administered once every few weeks and for all intense purposes the idea was a success. For the performance enhancing athlete Sustanon-250 can be a fine choice but the idea of injecting only once or twice a month is not applicable here. As a performance enhancer this testosterone like all forms will need to be administered on a more frequent basis. This mixture carries with it two fast, short esters, Propionate and Pheylpropionate, a longer more moderate ester Isocaproate and the very slow and long Decanoate ester. In order to keep testosterone levels stable and at their peak most athletes will inject Sustanon-250 at a minimum of every 3 days and more commonly every other day for optimal results.



For more info see: Sustanon-250

An animal defending against a predator may engage in either " fight or flight " in response to predator attack or threat of attack, depending on its estimate of the predator's strength relative to its own. Alternative defenses include a range of antipredator adaptations , including alarm signals . An example of an alarm signal is nerol, a chemical which is found in the mandibular glands of Trigona fulviventris individuals. [25] Release of nerol by T. fulviventris individuals in the nest has been shown to decrease the number of individuals leaving the nest by fifty percent, as well as increasing aggressive behaviors like biting. [25] Alarm signals like nerol can also act as attraction signals; in T. fulviventris, individuals that have been captured by a predator may release nerol to attract nestmates, who will proceed to attack or bite the predator. [25]

Explain testosterone

explain testosterone

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